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Crime Is Everyones Problem

More Street Cleaning


Now the folks over at that unbiased pro Joe blog aren't going to take note of this but NOH neighbors will. After all, some have been living with the NOH horrors for years now. Who knows the hood better then those who live in it!

Yesterday was a busy day again for dealers? and the police. I wasn't home to witness the events but others were. . . . . Post


Posted by Toni



Apparently there is a misconception on the part of some that if you support Joe Moore you support crime. That sounds like rather simplistic and non-nonsensical, the kind of campaign propaganda that flew heavily only a few months ago. I believe that other than those who directly benefit from the crime, no one else in the neighborhood thinks that crime is a good thing, should be supported or should be ignored as unimportant. I think that perhaps some of the Moore people are more sensitive to civil rights than some other might be, but everyone wants to see crime reduced. Crime is destructive, in different ways, to everyone involved.

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> the Moore people are more sensitive to civil rights than some other might be...

What about plain old 'human rights'? Stop playing the race card, it's tiring.

Drug abuse and bullets don't discriminate.

It is very easy to say that someone who would appear to be a drug dealer isn't that important and is a menace to society, but at that point you start to use personal standards rather than objective standards to make legal decisions. With 300 million Americans you then have 300 million standards. Even if you were to use societal standards it still creates many different standards of justice.

The idea that defending individual rights is “playing the race card” implies that the only rights being protected are those of one or certain races rather than those of all races. I would hope that you don’t feel that certain races don’t deserve the same rights as everyone else, but I am sure that you don’t.

There is one way to change societal standards in terms of constitutional rights: amending the constitution. The fact that it rarely has happened over the 200 plus years of American history indicates that consensus is difficult to reach. That further bolsters the point about having millions of different levels of justice once you move from the objective standard of equal protection for all.

> With 300 million Americans you then have 300 million standards. Even if you were to use societal standards it still creates many different standards of justice.

This sounds like a high school argument. Civil rights and human rights should be considered before creating pockets of poverty then telling neighbors to go to CAPS meetings and fix the problems.

As I stated: Drugs and Guns Don’t Discriminate

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